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Son Surprises Avid Bengals Fan Dad With Trip To Bengals Game

Son Surprises Avid Bengals Fan Dad With Trip To Bengals Game
Son Surprises Avid Bengals Fan Dad With Trip To Bengals Game

Last Sunday, amazing son Brian D decided to surprise his die-hard Cincinnati Bengals fan dad with tickets to the big game. 

Dad has always loved the Bengals, but had never even been to any NFL game his entire life. 

While the family was having a nice chill session in the living room, Brian dropped the news slowly.

First, he gave him an authentic Bengals cap, then an official Bengals jersey. After dad suited-up, Brian gave him the grand finale of plane tickets, hotel room reservations, and Bengals tickets. 

Tears were shed. 

Over the course of the week, the video has gone viral, already garnering over a quarter million views!

 

Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2013/10/10/son-surprises-avid-bengals-fan-dad-with-trip-to-bengals-game/

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Mauro Calo In Mercedes Pulls Off World Record Power Slide

Mauro Calo In Mercedes Pulls Off World Record Power Slide

Race car driver, Mauro Calo, pulled off a world record power slide in his Mercedes Benz. For basically three minutes, he laps around the race track sliding. Smoke from the tires pours out as he whipps around the track. I’m surprised there’s any rubber left on those tires.

 

Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2011/06/22/mercedes-pulls-off-world-record-power-slide/

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9-Year-Old Skateboarder Successfully Lands a 540 After 75 Tries

9-Year-Old Skateboarder Successfully Lands a 540 After 75 Tries

Watch out, Tony Hawk. This kid is shredding her way to the top.

At age 9, most young skateboarders are just learning to ollie, happy to successfully jump their boards a few inches.

Sabre Norris from New South Wales, Australia, can’t ride a bike, but has already tackled the halfpipe and landed her first 540. The trick requires the rider launch off a ramp, spin with the board one-and-a-half turns and successfully land back on the ramp.

skatebaord small

Video: YouTube, The Berrics

The video shows a few failed landings, but after 75 attempts that day, Norris finally landed the 540, according to The Berrics.

Her reaction to landing the trick is just as good as the feat itself.

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62-Year-Old Swimmer Live-Tweets Swim From Cuba to Florida

62-Year-Old Swimmer Live-Tweets Swim From Cuba to Florida

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Diana Nyad, a 62-year-old marathon swimmer from Los Angeles, Calif. is attempting to make history as she swims from Havana, Cuba to Florida, a distance of 103 miles, in what she calls the Xtreme Dream. Though Nyad’s in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, her support team is sharing updates from her journey on Twitter and her blog.

Nyad’s already encountered a storm and several jellyfish stings, though she keeps stroking at a strong pace, according to the team accompanying her who are updating her Twitter and blog.


The most recent blog post from this morning describes the conditions of her swim:

“We had quite a night. The weather was really ugly. All crew members safe. As of this morning, the weather is clear with light winds out of the SE. Seas are calm and Diana is swimming strong at 50 strokes per minute and has swum 33.81 statute miles. There have been no jellyfish sightings our experts report. Beautiful out!”

Her tweets include similar details from the experience:

Her website DianaNyad.com also includes a map of where she is in her swim between Cuba and Florida:

Nyad first attempted the distance from Cuba to the U.S. three decades ago when she was 29. Extreme weather on the course already teaming with sharks, jellyfish and pollution, left her heading toward Texas, rather than Florida.

Are you interested in following extreme athletes on Twitter? Let us know what you think of Diana’s social presence in the comments.

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Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/08/20/diana-nyad-twitter/

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Tanzanian Woman Shows Off Soccer Skills

Tanzanian Woman Shows Off Soccer Skills

Soccer, or football at it’s properly called around the world, is especially big in Africa. One woman from Tanzania shows that though she may not have much, she does have some impressive soccer skills. Let’s get this woman on a professional team already.


Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2011/03/27/tanzanian-woman-shows-off-soccer-skills/

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Crazy Spanish Announcer: Ra Da Da Da After Kobe Bryant Three Pointer

Crazy Spanish Announcer: Ra Da Da Da After Kobe Bryant Three Pointer

For some reason, this video from last year has had a recent spike in viral viewership. It’s a clip of Kobe Bryant shooting the game winning three point shot against the Miami Heat with a Spanish speaking announcer. When Kobe sinks the shot the announcer keeps saying, “Ra da da da da da da da da da,” over and over.


Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2011/03/31/crazy-spanish-announcer-ra-da-da-da-after-kobe-bryant-three-pointer/

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Seattle Seahawks Bird Lands On Fan’s Head At Seattle Seahawks Game

Seattle Seahawks Bird Lands On Fan’s Head At Seattle Seahawks Game
Seattle Seahawks Bird Lands On Fan’s Head At Seattle Seahawks Game

Before the Seahawks vs Giants game at CenturyLink Field, a Seahawks fan experienced a very unique, and painful, close encounter with the team’s live mascot. A very real hawk was set free by its trainer to fly around the stadium and hype up the fans. But instead of returning to its traienr, the great bird landed on a fan’s head. Ouch! It’s no surprise this rare clip by FOX Sports has gone viral!

 

Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2014/11/10/seattle-seahawks-bird-lands-on-fans-head-at-seattle-seahawks-game/

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Why High School Football In Texas Is More Than Just A Game

Why High School Football In Texas Is More Than Just A Game

Friday Night LightsFriday Night Lights

Friday Night Lights

There are many, many numbers that could put into context just how dominant Texas’ football pedigree is.

With over 165,000 teens playing football at over 1,000 schools during the 2012-13 school year, Texas had, by far, the largest number of high school football players in the country.

Of the 128 schools that participate in the top level of Division I college football, the Lone Star State is home to 12, making it the most of any state in the US.

When it comes to starting quarterbacks at the college level, 18 hailed from Texas. Eight more began the season as starters for their teams in the NFL. Both numbers are the most in their respective categories.

But it takes much more than facts and figures to capture Texas’ love for football. The midwestern state’s affection for the sport is a topic of discussion that touches on competition, culture and community. And that makes football much more than just a game.

In Texas, football is religion

Like anything that sends people into a craze, there is no single way to describe why fans across America, never mind Texas, love football so much. One of the most common ways, though, in which people describe how dedicated Texans are to the game, is by likening that love to faith.

One high school coach told “60 Minutes” in 1981:

It’s almost like going to church; you do that on Sunday, you play football on Friday nights.

And the people congregate faithfully. As San Antonio sportswriter David Flores narrates in the video above, the famous Friday night lights of high school football have the power to pull practically the whole population of a town into any given stadium.

Football games are also known to “shut down the town,” in the Lone Star State. It’s the belief that once football starts, everything else in the area stops. And in Texas, people believe.

When former Texas Longhorn standout Jordan Shipley was setting state records at Burnet High School, he described his football games to ABC News‘ Bob Brown as events that “shut down the town.”

And as part of that same report by Brown, 71-year-old high school super fan Bennie Cotton noted,

You go to those small towns … and everything revolves around the high school football team. To those people, football is NOT the Dallas Cowboys. Football is the school in the town where they live. They close down the towns for a high school football game.

When it comes down to it, high school football is just Texas’ thing.


But why does it make them so proud?

Texan communities rally around their respective high school football teams; that’s a given. But what’s most fascinating is the sense of pride those teams give their towns.

After all, any group of people can be entertained by a good product, but the way Texans regard their football culture as a special part of their identity truly tells the story of how much they love the game.

It’s a part of their very being, as one high school booster told Buzz Bissinger, the famed author of “Friday Night Lights” in 1990:

Life really wouldn’t be worth livin’ if you didn’t have a high school football team to support.

But what about football makes Texans so proud to the point that, as Shipley said, it’s all they talk about during the week? One answer seems to be the idea of heritage. When it comes to high school football fans in Texas, the fans of today are the sons and daughters of fans of yesterday.

One supporter of Shipley’s Burnet Bulldogs told ABC:

I’m sitting in the seats that my parents sat in. And my children have added seats that are adjacent to us. Our whole family sits in one section.

The notion that legacies play a part in high school football fandom makes sense, too. Texas, as a whole, has a reputation for keeping its natives within state lines. According to a recent Gallup poll, Texas is among the states with residents who are most content with staying put.

And while the economic climate of a town can change over time, football seems like one of the cherished constants in life for the Texans who call their small towns home. In his book, Bissinger highlighted the effect such a constant can have on a person’s pride.

One fan of the infamous Permian Panthers of Friday Night Lights told the author:

[Residents] can go anywhere in the state and brag about it. They get kicked around on the social fabric. They get kicked around on the terrain—it is flat and has no trees. But they sure play great football.


Doing it big

The sense of community, the heritage and the resulting pride all go a long way in explaining why Texans love football so much. It also helps tell the story of all the ways in which that love manifests off the field — and on it.

Simply put, the state does football big.

The disaster that was the $60 million Eagle Stadium of Allen, Texas hasn’t deterred Katy, Texas from building its own mega stadium for high school ball. Just this month, the town approved the building of a $58 million stadium that would seat 12,000 fans and service seven high schools.

And while the stadium has its fair share of critics, the mere idea of high school football driving in ridiculous crowds is nothing new. The state championship playoffs, held at the Dallas Cowboys’ AT&T stadium every year, are known to draw more in attendance than the average college football bowl game.

And the Cowboys connection to the junior game doesn’t stop there, either. Starting in 2016, the Cowboys will practice at a shiny new facility in Frisco, Texas. The best part, for residents, about that facility is that seven local high school football teams will have access to the world-class resources that the Cowboys enjoy.

Of the facility, Dallas owner Jerry Jones told Sports Illustrated’s MMQB:

My vision is that one day, Tony Romo will walk off the field to the west after practice, and a high school quarterback will walk on the field from the east the minute Tony leaves. That vision, that marriage of the Cowboys and Texas high school football, has been a driving force for me.

The plan in itself embodies everything that Texas high school football has become known for: Their love for the bright lights of the pro game are rooted in a deeper love for the local game at a much younger level.

Texans take pride in their games more than most and that has the Lone Star state doing high school football bigger and better than anyone else.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/sports/high-school-football-texas-just-game/849033/